Guardians of the Galaxy - Milano

Why Guardians of the Galaxy Is The Best Thing Marvel Could Have Done

The announcement of Guardians of the Galaxy (GotG) as the 10th installment in the spectacular Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), was met with mixed reactions. I, on the other hand, was super excited; rewatching each trailer dozens of times in anticipation.

After seeing the movie last night, I believe that GotG is the absolute best thing Marvel could have done for the franchise, and I’ll tell you why without any spoilers.

Except the ones in the section marked Spoilers, at the end…

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Introducing Grapevine 2.7.1

Introducing : Grapevine, A C# REST Server Class Library

Grapevine is .NET 4.0 class library I wrote in C# to provide my applications with an easy way to include a REST server without a dependency on ASP.NET.  While I was at it, I made it a simple HTTP server at the same time.  And added the ability to be a REST client, too.  All that, in one simple class library.

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Warm Bodies

Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse

In honor of the 40th anniversary of the Rubik’s Cube, I bring you something totally unrelated!

The End Is Coming?

To all you like-minded individuals who see the impending rise of the undead and want to be as prepared as you can, may I provide you with my favorite Zombie Survival Sheet.

Zombie Survival Sheet v 5.0
Zombie Survival Sheet v 5.0

Use this handy reference to help you plan, purchase, and stockpile your way to long term survival.

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The Demystification of Perl

Declassifying Perl Method Arguments

I have plans to do an entire series of articles on the sheer awesomeness that is my native tongue (Perl).  I envision whole sections dedicated to setting up your environment, tips for beginners and intermediates alike, and maybe an advanced topic or two.  At that point, this blog post will firmly fall under the category of “Appendix“.

Nevertheless, this information was hard earned and will save me lots of time, so I wanted to share in the blessed bliss.

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My Favorites Logo

My Favorite String Extensions

I know, it doesn’t quite roll off the tongue like the old black-and-white TV show title.

As early as Visual Studio 2008, C# has provided a special kind of static method called extension methods.  We can use these extension methods to extend a class or interface, but not override it.  This provides the ability to “add” methods to existing types without creating a new derived type, recompiling, or otherwise modifying the original type.

Think of it as Microsoft’s answer to prototype in Javascript, letting you add methods on the fly to any type you want.  I took advantage of them  in a recent article I wrote on extending enum using custom attributes.

By far my favorite use of extension methods are when it comes to manipulating Strings.  It must be the Perl in me.  So, without any further ado, here are a few of my faves.

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Steampunk Interior

The Steampunk Color Palette

At our house, we love steampunk!  So, when I came across an interview in STIR Magazine with the founder of Steampunk By Design, I had to read it.

By far the best part for me was a list on the second page of a steampunk color palette, with links to a popular paint manufacturers website where they provided the hex values for the colors.

So, I aim to share them here with you, in all their glory, but in no particular order.

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Lions, Tigers and Bears, oh my!

Attributes, Extensions and Enums, Oh My!

Extending Enum in C# Using Custom Attributes and Methods

I love enumerations.  Simple, consistent and – in OO languages like Java and C# – enforced by the IDE.  But I know I’m not the only one who has lamented over the apparent inability to extend the Enum data type in C#.  If you stumbled upon this post, you’ve probably had the same problem.

Keep reading to see what I did to alleviate this shortcoming.

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Bears. Beets. Battlestar Galactica

The Office : Six Stages of Debugging

I recently discovered The Office Stare Machine, which captures every time a character on The Office stares into the camera and says nothing, then categorizes these “stares” based on the emotion being expressed.

I found this to be the perfect opportunity to capture  the apocryphal Six Stages of Debugging in the expressions of the ever intrepid Jim Halpert (with a few other pop-culture references sprinkled in the links).

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